Month: July 2008

N’ the Cut

N’ the Cut barbershop opened about a week ago at 3609 NE MLK. The property is owned by Danny and Virginia Hankins, and managed by Broadus Realty, operated by James Broadus. Broadus Realty has opened up an office in the back of the building, and seeks to rent out the space adjacent to N’ the Cut (at 3611).

The building to the left of N’ the Cut in this picture, 3601 NE MLK, was purchased by Chester Johnson last year for $30,000 and is zoned for a restaurant, according to portlandmaps.com.

belly.

‘belly’ opened this month in the Fremont Building (Fremont & MLK), in the space formerly occupied by Terroir.  The Oregonian quotes one of the co-owners (without specifying which one),  Cameron and Linda Addy, thus: “We wanted to give it a lived-in feel,” Addy says. “We decorated the space as if it were our home and we were having Portland over for a dinner party.”

belly’s menu (available on belly’s website) is rather meat-heavy, so it’s unlikely that I’ll be stopping by other than on one of my very occasional meat-eating days, but I did stop in and introduce myslf to co-owner Linda Addy.  She told me that she hopes to work with the owners of Alu in hopes of stirring up some neighborhood-themed cross-promotion.

Fernando Auto Repair, again.

This picture from a couple of months ago doesn’t show you the fun, bright yellow building that F.A.R. used until recently; it does show you the ‘for sale’ sign which only briefly appeared on the shop’s fencing.  I’m posting this photo to note that when I walked by the shop last week, there was a bill from the City of Portland ripped open and stuck in the fencing – a water bill for four thousand dollars.

Signs, part 2.

A cricket wireless sign… but no cricket wireless store. There’s a cricket store at Weidler and MLK – according to a disinterested salesperson there, a cricket store did briefly exist in the parking lot behind this sign.

What *is* in the parking lot, attached to the Alladat clothing store, is a melange of different things: Exclusive Shoes and Clothing, operated out of a shed; space where you can have your car hand washed; and Mecca Fish and Chips, seen in the cart in the center of the photo above. To its left is a cart with a television mounted in its side.

Signs, part 1.

This sketch of Jim Carrey’s “The Mask” on a sign in front of Quality Auto Repair has caught my eye for awhile. I went into the lot and asked a gentleman sitting on a chair in front of a pile of tires for any stories about the sign he could tell; he was busy looking through a pair of binoculars and suggested that the sign had something to do with an auto upholstery business run out of a shack in the lot. Hmm, not likely.

On the top part the sign is a sketch of what appears to be downtown Portland from the east side of the river.

Oregonian reports that the Garlington Center to remain open

The Oregonian (July23rd 2008) reports thus:

After an outpouring of community opposition to plans to shutter the Garlington Center and divide clients among other providers, Multnomah County leaders agreed to allow Cascadia to keep operating the clinic, which serves mostly low-income, minority residents.

Cascadia’s Garlington Center occupies a long, skinny one-story office building at 3034 NE MLK.

These offices used to contain the Northeast Youth Opportunity Center, or YO Center, a place President George W. Bush visited and gave a speech at in 2002. Cascadia and the city agreed to let Cascadia operate the Garlington Center in these offices in 2006; the Eliot Neighborhood Association opposed this decision.

As Matt Gilley (‘Eliot resident’) wrote in an article in the Eliot News (a quarterly neighborhood newspaper), “[A]dding a drug-treatment outpatient and clinic for mentally ill, and mentally ill ex-convicts, will have a chilling effect no positive commercial and economic growth along MLK.” The article also cites the high number of social service agencies lining the Boulevard already, as well as the city’s process for siting such facilities, as reasons to oppose the opening of the Garlington Center.

Eliot residents even revived a dormant action group called “Friends of MLK” the opening of Garlington Center; Friends of MLK had originally been formed to protest the proposed opening of a McDonald’s on MLK (something I will write more about later).

Union Rose celebrates its one-year anniversary

This weekend, apparel shop Union Rose celebrates one year at 2023 NE MLK:

Celebratory events described thus:

THIS WEEKEND
Our 1st Birthday Bash,
July 25 & 26

10% off items in store and online in our Etsy Shop.

Friday night we’ll stay open late, and our friendly neighbor, Tiny’s Coffee,
will show the movie Flash Gordon in the parking lot. Bring a pillow or chair
and enjoy a flick under the stars.

All day Saturday – Sidewalk Sale!
Along with great deals from our local designers and artists, there’ll be a
Kids Activity Area with hands on projects all day long. Sweet treats to be
had, as well, so join us and say Happy Birthday!